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Summer Viewing List

Bonjour chers lecteurs,

My name is Ilyssa Silverman, and I’m an intern at the Alliance Française this summer. I am a rising sophomore at Tufts University, a French and Biopsychology major, and an avid francophile and movie addict. This weekend, I’d like to share some of my favorite French movies with you. Sit back, relax, and enjoy these fantastic films, all of which are available at our Médiathèque:

 

Les intouchables (The Intouchables)

2011, Eric Toledano and Olivier Nakache, 1 h 53 m

Besides Amélie, this is perhaps the French film anglophones know best. Les intouchables has truly earned its fame. Watch an unlikely friendship develop between a wealthy quadriplegic and his caregiver from the projects. If you’re sick of people telling you to watch it, and you haven’t watched it already, please do. If you have already watched it, you likely don’t need convincing to want to watch it again. This movie will make you laugh, make you cry, and likely stick with you for a long time.

 

 

 

La grande illusion (The Great Illusion)

1937, Jean Renoir, 1 h 57 m

Before I scare you away by saying this film is from 1937 (too late), I must tell you that this is one of the most perpetually-relevant films of all time. On the surface, this black and white film seemingly about WWI is not exactly what draws the crowds in 2017, but this film is so masterfully-crafted that it can be appreciated in any era. La grande illusion has the extraordinary ability to express anti-war sentiments through unconventional yet effective means. In lieu of showing gruesome images of war, the film shows similarity and sympathy between supposed enemies, blurring lines between nationalities and social classes and calling into question the validity of borders between people and places.

 

 

OSS 117: Le caire, nid d’espions (OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies)

2006, Michel Hazanavicius, 1 h 39 m

There is no profound reason why this movie is on the list other than that I’ve never laughed out loud so hard at a television screen. If you think of French film as the intersection of artsy and pretentious, you should definitely let this king of all French comedies prove you wrong. Somewhere between James Bond and Jacques Clouseau, Agent 117 is dashing yet dimwitted, suave yet simple-minded.

 

 

 

L’arnacoeur (The Heartbreaker)

2010, Pascal Chaumeil, 1 h 44 m

Another comedy for your summer enjoyment, L’arnacoeur (A play on the words arnaqueur and coeur, “con-man” and “heart”) is about a man who makes his living by breaking up couples who don’t belong together. He and his ingenious team convince unhappy couples to split with the best tool they have: seduction. Chick flick? Perhaps. Uproariously funny? Absolutely.

 

 

 

 

La haine (The Hate)

1995, Mathieu Kassovitz, 1 h 38 m

This film, a drama shot documentary-style, won director Mathieu Kassovitz the Best Director award at Cannes and Best Film at the Césars (not to mention my utmost respect). The matter-of-fact manner in which the film is presented throws you into the harsh reality of three young men in the Paris banlieues, their anger towards police and society, the anger aimed back towards them, and their struggle to turn their futile existence into something more meaningful and escape the hold that the banlieue has on them. Not only is this film a close examination of its characters and their motivations, but it is an examination of society. You learn why society sees Vinz, Hubert, and Saïd the way they do (and vice versa), but you’re still left with large, lingering questions about our societal structure as a whole.

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